Chapter 5 post

How does the Haifa day-care experiment relate to the actions of– and on– the web? 

Are you part of any “sharing cultures” that are facilitated by– or even exist completely on– the web?
What are the problems Shirky proposes, whether you agree with him or not, with the “brain surgery” argument?

In regards to the experiment-I immediately, without reading the whole page, knew what the outcome would be. I have done exactly what those parents did. Once I had to pay late fees I thought that the extra 20 dollars for the day was worth the chance to have a half an hour to run to the store without kids. I am not real proud of myself, but it is the truth. The adding of the fee was like an ok to take advantage-after all they got paid. This book sure has made me rethink some things, lol. I am not too sure of its relation to actions on the “web” other that it seems like it is a whole lot easier to be bold about any given subject and to clash with others online where you are pretty anonymous. If I put it in the context of cost, clarity and community though it makes a bit more sense to me. When the parents had to pay for lateness (cost) the caregivers role changed (community).

I loved the section of the chapter about the Invisible College. I don’t believe it is stated in the chapter outright-but I think he was talking about the birth of the scientific method, which is truly interesting.

I am part of a few sharing cultures that are totally online. I mentioned them in the previous posts.

I am not sure that I am in agreement with Shirky on the brain surgery argument. While I certainly won’t be engaging a prostitute any time soon, I still trust professionals over amateurs most times. Are all professionals worth their salt, no, but most amateurs are just that. The idea that sometimes having someone do something for you as an amateur is better than having done by a professional works in some areas (like personal life), but I still wouldn’t want an amateur operating on my brain.

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